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Russia's President Vladimir Putin during a video conference meeting on the COVID-19 cornavirus situation in Russia, at Novo-Ogaryovo residence. Alexei Druzhinin/Russian Presidential Press and Information Office/TASS
The long-awaited personal meeting between US President Joe Biden and his Russian counterpart Vladimir Putin will happen on June 16 in Switzerland, a traditionally neutral country that isn’t a member of any major military bloc.

Biden and Putin will hold a bilateral summit in Geneva, the Kremlin confirmed. The city hosts many international organizations and often offers a third-party platform for various meetings.

While it won’t be the first time the politicians meet in person, all their previous one-on-ones happened before Biden was elected to hold the White House. The two national leaders have a wide array of difficult topics to discuss, considering that the US and Russia are currently at the lowest point in their relations in decades.

President Joe Biden prepares to sign a series of executive orders at the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office just hours after his inauguration on January 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. Biden became the 46th president of the United States earlier today during the ceremony at the U.S. Capitol. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Showcasing the strained ties was President Biden’s remark in March, when during an interview he agreed that Putin was a “killer”. The Russian president responded by wishing his counterpart good health and citing a Russian childrens’ insult-deflecting saying that “whatever you say [about others] is what you are yourself”.

The Biden administration accused Russia of a range of sinister actions, from hacking American computer networks to militarizing the Arctic region to ‘weaponizing’ its vaccines against Covid-19 to hurt the interests of the US and its allies. Moscow says Washington is simply trying to hurt the Russian economy with groundless sanctions and political accusations because it cannot tolerate governments that pursue sovereign policies.